What A Hot Summer In Fukushima 2013!

This summer has been super hot! Do you agree? The last few weeks especially have been very hot and humid.

Today is not too bad because it has been raining on and off. It’s still very humid though.

Here are 5 tips for coping with the humidity of Fukushima’s hot and humid summer!

1. Drink plenty of fluids. I always have a glass or bottle of water nearby.
You must keep your body hydrated on hot days, especially if you spend a lot of time outside.

2. Wear cool clothes. If possible wear shorts and a T-shirt to work. If that is not possible, wear very loose fitting clothes or clothes with good ventilation.

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3. Go swimming! My kids love to go swimming even though our swimming pool is tiny.

4. Use air conditioning but use it sparingly. I set the air conditioner to 28 degrees. I don’t want to use too much electricity because I care about the environment.

I hope you can get some ideas of how to stay cool in the intense heat this summer time.

Do you have any other ideas for dealing with the heat?

Stuart

Unagi Day

eel

I always ask students to tell me about Unagi day. Many people don’t know much about the origins of this tradition and eat unagi, simply because it is promoted. One of my high school students explained the history of Unagi day as coming from a simple promotion strategy for eel catchers back in the edo period.

Unfortunately it seems that Japanese eels have been over consumed to the point where they are becoming extinct. A news report that i saw today says that the volume of imported eel has dropped by 35% this year due to decline stocks even from outside Japan.

Undoubtedly prices have gone up but the problem is really that people don’t seem to care that species extinction has a real impact on our environment.  People buy eels because its “tradition” (ie. doing something for the sake of doing it) or because people are told to do so, and now people will buy it as a luxury item as it becomes rare and expensive.

http://japandailypress.com/japanese-eel-now-officially-seen-as-endangered-0422595/

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2013/07/12/business/imports-of-mature-eels-fall-sharply